A Reader’s Mystery Challenge

I love Agatha Christie. If you have visited this blog before, you’ve probably gathered that. Her sharp wit and intriguing plots called to me when I delved deeper into the world of mysteries. I knew of her, as many people know of Arthur Conan Doyle and Shakespeare. Just the main facts and a bit of knowledge about the stories that made them famous. As I lived with a Sherlock Holmes lover for many years, I knew a fair amount about his creator. But I didn’t get into Agatha’s world until later in my reading career.

Agatha Christie lived an extraordinary life, and had a writing career that many writers would dream of. Overtime she wrote 66 detective novels, 14 short stories, plays, and romance novels. How the woman managed to create and solve that many mysteries still baffles me. She is an inspiration to me both as a writer, and as a woman. She traveled all over the world and wrote these locations into her novels. She even disappeared when she was younger and evaded the police for eleven days before reappearing. What an awesome lady! In some ways, I hope to be like her when I grow up.

This year marks the 100th anniversary for the release of her first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles. The first time the world met the eccentric but lovable Hercule Poirot. The man whose sharp wit still attracts readers today. I didn’t have the chance to read this Poirot story until very recently, when I was able to listen to an Audible version. It certainly started him off with a bang! In honor of this anniversary, I have revisited a goal that I jokingly made one November evening. I had just finished The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, which I threw across my dorm room because of my frustration with Agatha. Not at her lack of plot or writing style, far from it. I was livid that she was so good! I couldn’t figure out how she managed to put her red herrings in the perfect spots. I imagined her laughing to herself, thinking about how I, around 90 years later, would suspect the correct culprit. But I would be thrown off by a tiny nugged she planted, and ignore the other signs until the final shoe dropped. After that evening, I set a goal for myself. Before I die, I want to read all of her work.

This goal is not a crazy one. There are people the same age as me, or younger, who have already completed this goal. But the vast world of books is large, and so is her catalogue. Still, I want to go on this reading quest. At first, I foolishly believed I could read all of these works by my 26th birthday next March. Seeing as I have only read 8 of her books and plays so far, that was a dumb idea. Instead, I decided to push the date to a slightly more feasible time. Before I turn thirty, around five years from now, I want to finish these books. Five years seems like a long time to finish 70-something books, especially when I try to read 40 books a year. But, like many readers, I have books I want to read every year. And many of her novels feel at home in the crisp autumn air more than the balming heat of summer. This means many of the mystery novels I read aren’t opened again until the first of September. Despite all of this, I am determined to read all of these stories. I can do it! And you can too!

Have you read all of Agatha’s stories? If so, which ones were your favorite? This list is a bit overwhelming, so a few suggestions would be a great jumping off point! If you’ve never read an Agatha Christie, I highly recommend checking them out. Especially if you love mysteries with a good plot twist. You might even decide to join me on this quest to read them all. Trust me, I have a feeling it will be worth it. Happy reading everyone!

5 GIFS That Perfectly Show A Fiction Lover’s Reaction to Non-fiction

If the title didn’t give you a hint, I love reading fiction. There are so many fun options and genres to choose from! I could jump into the world of historical fiction, or go on a quest with Harry to find the horcruxes. I could help Holmes and Watson solve a mystery, and even journey on a flying steamship to London. The prospect of visiting all these worlds makes my fingers itch to open another book. If you put a non-fiction book in front of me, the reaction is not the same. In fact, I often have the exact opposite feelings. I found five gifs that perfectly describe my experience reading non-fiction. They might line up with your experience as well!

  1.  After you read a stereotypical non-fiction book. 

Image from GIPHY

  1. When someone tells you they found a non-fiction book that even fiction lovers would like. 

Image from GIPHY

  1. Me trying to read a non-fiction book once a year as someone out of school. 

Image from GIPHY

  1. When I found a non-fiction book that I thought I’d like but I ended up hating it. 

 Image from GIPHY

  1. When I finally find a non-fiction book with an interesting topic and writing style 

Image from GIPHY

Are you a fiction lover? What’s your experience when reading non-fiction? Have you found any non-fiction books that are perfect for fiction lovers? Let me know in the comments below! If you’re a non-fiction lover, do you have any recommendations? I’d love to give non-fiction novels another shot. Especially historical non-fiction! Thanks so much for checking out my post and happy reading!

5 Classics I Actually Enjoyed Reading in School

Somehow, we’ve reached the time when the school supply section is back in stores. The fresh smell of college-lined paper is in the air all around us. Unfortunately, this time is more complicated than back-to-school last year. But whichever way this situation plays out, the time of learning is almost back. As someone somewhat fresh out of school, I still have a vivid memory of the long nights of studying and homework. One of the things I both dreaded and looked forward to was the reading. I’m sure this isn’t a surprise, but I was the person who would read extra books on the summer reading list. But not all books you read in school are fun, especially once you get into the classics. There were many that I read with a tinge of annoyance. But, it was surprising to find that a few of these classics were good and interesting to me.

Image from Goodreads.com

  1. The Alchemist– Paulo Coelho

My sophomore year of high school is not a year that I remember well. There are gaps in the time frame that I have to ask others to fill in. But I can’t forget the feeling of reading this book. The Alchemist is like many stories. A young man goes on a quest to find a treasure far away. During his journey, he learns more about the real treasures of life. It sounds like many of the hero’s journey stories that you read in school. The fascinating thing about this simple story was its impact. Everyone in my class felt excited to talk about the story, excited to read another chapter. Many of us finished the book early because we were so captured by the story. To me, this novel is a classic because of its simplicity. We can all put ourselves in the shoes of that shepherd boy traveling the world. It didn’t have dark themes or a tragic ending, but still managed to get its point across to a group of sixteen year-olds. It was a light in a sea of darker novels. Someday, I want to read this book again and again to capture the feeling it gave me all those years ago. If you want to learn more about this book, you can check it out on Goodreads here.

Image from Goodreads.com

  1. The Odyssey– Homer

Reading this classic was enjoyable for a few reasons. First, my love of Greek of mythology. When the gods I loved to read about growing up popped up, I loved discussing their sections of the story. Also, it’s a fun mix of a road trip story and a hero’s journey-style quest. I was starting to enjoy these types of stories around the time I read this, so it was perfect timing. The most important thing, though, was not the story itself. They say that teachers change your outlook on a subject. For me, that was the case with this book and my freshman honors English teacher. Mr. Barlew had a great way of explaining stories to make them more applicable to modern readers. This was true for The Odyssey. While it’s full of adventures, the language can be a bit hard to decipher. Mr. Barlew used creative ways of teaching to make this story more fun to read. This included acting out the final battle between Odysseus and Penelope’s suitors. Picture a group of fifteen year-olds play-fighting in a library with yardsticks. Needless to say, that rocketed this classic into my top ten. If you want to learn more about this classic tale, you can check it out on Goodreads here.

Image from Goodreads.com

  1. Sense and Sensibility–  Jane Austen

This classic is the only one on the list that I read in college. Sure, I was familiar with Austen’s work, but I hadn’t read any of it until my second semester of Freshman year. I had heard the title of this story before, but I knew little to nothing about the characters. What drew me to this classic was the sister dynamic. I have a sister, and even though we aren’t exactly like Elinor and Marianne, it was easy to relate to them. Also, I’m a bit more of a hopeless romantic than my sister, so I felt their dynamic on a deep level. I read a moment where Marianne was being a bit dramatic about something and thought “oh look, it’s me”. After reading the book, we also watched the movie. It stars my favorite almost name-buddy, so I knew I would love it. I love Emma Thompson, and it was fun to see Alan Rickman out of his Snume. This movie did add to my love of the story because of the actor’s ability to bring their characters into being. Emma felt like Elinor, and Kate excelled as Marianne. Sometimes watching the movie version does help you appreciate the story more! If you want to dive into Austen’s tale, you can check it out on Goodreads here.

Image from Goodreads.com

  1. The Things They Carried– Tim O’Brien

When I first saw this story on the list of reading for my I.B. English class, I was a bit skeptical. For me, stories involving war can go three ways when I read them. The first results in a very sad Emily who is just depressed about life now… thanks book. The second is a more action-movie approach that has me reading on the edge of my seat like I’m watching an Avengers film. The third is a book written in boring, detached language that makes it a droll to get through. This classic took these ideas and threw them out the window. The writing style was like an interesting fiction novel. Also, the themes blew my fellow classmates’ minds. I don’t want to spoil much if you haven’t read this story, but we had a lot of great conversations about the meaning of “truth”. Intrigued? You can learn more about O’Brien’s story here.

Image from Goodreads.com

  1. Romeo and Juliet– William Shakespeare

This may seem like a cliche, but hear me out. This was the first Shakespeare play I ever read. Is it my favorite? No. But I have such fond memories reading this play in class. That is again thanks to the wonderful Mr. Barlew. Teachers can make a big difference y’all. He took a No Fear Shakespeare approach to teaching us the play. For example, he explained to us that “do you bite your thumb at me sir” is equal to someone flipping you off. He then proceeded to read the passage over using the modern terminology, which made it a lot funnier. We acted out scenes and had lively discussions. Also, the blubbering of the boys in my class when they learned of the age gap was eventful. Want to revisit this iconic play and it’s quips? You can check it out here

While there have been the duds over the years, I’ve been lucky to read many more classics that I still enjoy to this day. I’ve been consulting my list recently to find some books that I want to give another read. I’m looking forward to revisiting not only the stories, but also the memories I associate with them. What are your favorite classics that you read in school? Do you have any that you think I need to check out? Let me know in the comments below! Thanks so much for stopping by my blog, and happy reading!

A Goodreads 2020 Update!

It’s hard to believe that tomorrow we’ll be into month seven of 2020! To call this year a wild-ride would most likely be an understatement. Every week I have thought “I wonder what surprise occurrence will happen this time.” Like I said in my last post, I have been able to focus more on my hobbies to keep my spirits up. One of the small silver linings of this time is that I have more time to read. And since I’ve laid out a more challenging Goodreads goal this year, it’s a welcome opportunity.

When I discovered the Goodreads challenge a few years ago, I found it a way to make my reading feel productive. Recently, I’ve been procrastinating on doing some productive things by doing others. Instead of vacuuming, I’m watching a video about a historical figure. When I should be searching the internet for blog inspiration, I’m reading. It has been a great way to feel that I’ve accomplished something during this weird time vortex.

Thanks to the miracle of book tapes and intriguing storytelling, I’ve clocked myself in at 24 books as of the publication of this post. To my utter excitement, I’m 5 books ahead of schedule. According to the Goodreads site, that is. There’s hope that I’ll wrap up with 40 books, or maybe even more, by Jan 1, 2021!

While this is exciting, I haven’t challenged myself with a book recently. I’ve been diving into the glorious world of beach mysteries and fun rom-coms. These are lovely books to read, but I wanted to add some classics and “challenging” reads to my reading list. I want to learn, to grow as a person in this crazy world we live in. I also want to beef up my random fact repertoire, which I feel has been a bit stagnant since I graduated college. Either way, I’m looking forward to the new worlds and stories that are in my future

Do you have any book recommendations that you think I should add to my list? How is your Goodreads challenge going? Let me know in the comments below! Thanks so much for checking out my blog. I can’t believe I’ve been doing this for around eight months! It makes me so happy that my words are interesting enough for you to return for new posts. I hope y’all have a great week, and happy reading!

3 Ways Reading Improves Your Writing Skills

If you talk to a writer in the throes of their writing process, you’ll hear a similar thought: “writing is hard”. This is especially true when you’re kind of new to writing, like me. If it’s a writer with the cursed writer’s block, the feeling is tenfold. There are many different ways to help improve your writing skills. Among this list of ideas is one that some writers stay away from like it’s the plague; reading. 

Reading, believe it or not, can be a huge asset to your writing skills. This is a fact that most writers know well, but some still shake their heads at the idea. Reading novels, especially ones in the same genre that you’re writing, is a great way to hone your craft. Think about a book that you love the most in the genre. What do you like about it?  Why do you return to the novel over and over again? Considering these questions can help you improve three aspects of your story. 

1. Stronger Characters

Oftentimes our favorite stories give us examples of how to improve our characters. Reread the novel and consider a few things as you read. What are the strengths of these characters? What are their weaknesses? Are there traits that make them especially likable? If it’s a villain/antagonist, how do they challenge the protagonist? Also, how do all the characters add to the plot progression?

Keep a notebook or laptop beside you and take notes. Consider some of the questions I asked and any others that you feel are important. After you’ve compiled a list of these traits, think about how you can apply them to your novel. Make sure you’re not copying and pasting these characters into your own story. They are inspiration, not parts of a story to recycle. If I recycled traits from Poirot and created a similar Belgian sleuth, it would be obvious. Instead, use general descriptions of the characters you admire and adapt them to your own. Are you a fan of Sherlock Holmes? Instead of creating a carbon copy of the sleuth, hone in on what makes you like him. If it’s his observation skills, use that to create a character with sharp skills in a different way. They could be a smart socialite who can read people from their years of training. Or, they could be a dedicated Doctor who spends hours studying their patients to be the best Doctor they can. 

In some genres it can be hard to take inspiration without people noticing, like the mystery genre. If you have an observant person solving a case, people are going to think of Holmes. Make sure you add other traits to your characters to make them more than a carbon copy.  

2. Honed Writing Style

Deciding on a writing style can be a tricky task. You have to consider the genre, the story, the characters, and what you want to say with your story. This is when consulting books in the same genre is a must. When reading them, pay attention to their style. Are they witty? Is the writing painting a vivid world, or one left up to the reader’s imagination? What kind of words and sentence structure do they use? Is it more light-hearted or serious?

Get that notebook or laptop out again and keep the notes flowing. Jot down some keywords to describe the writing styles you gravitate towards. Do this for stories within and outside the genre you’re writing. Use these words to find the commonalities. If you find the witty and punchy style of Terry Pratchett up your alley, think about why. How can you adapt it to help improve your style? I find it also helps to read the novel that inspires you right before writing. If you have the style and vibe fresh in your mind, it’s way easier to channel it in your own story. Make sure you’re not copying, instead use that style to pull a similar vibe out of your own writing skills. 

3.  Well-formed Plots

Plotting has always been the bane of my existence. I can jump around and write scenes, but putting them into a coherent plot is another story. When I’m lost I look to stories within the genre that I want to write. If you experience a similar situation, ask yourself a few questions while reading. What plot structure are they using? How do they build the story so that the end makes sense? If it’s a mystery, how are they dropping hints to the readers? What about the story structure makes the climax impactful? 

As you’ve suspected, it’s time to take notes. Think about some of the questions I’ve asked, as well as any others you find important to your story. Also, pay attention to how the plot impacts the characters. A good plot has to include character growth! If you can get your hands on a book on plot structure, it’s also a great help. I read Save the Cat Write a Novel by Jessica Brody. It was a real lifesaver! Once you have all your notes complied, try plotting out your own novel. Writing key plot points on notecards and placing them on a wall is a great way to organize. If you want to challenge yourself, try using this method to visualize the plot of the novel you studied. Once you have it in front of you, take notes or pictures of the sections of the plot that you want to put into your own story. With these ideas at hand you can get off to the races!

How does reading improve your writing skills? Is there a novel that inspired you to write? Let me know in the comments below! I hope that you can apply some of this advice to your own stories in the future. Good luck with your writing, and happy reading!

A Reader’s Burnout

Reading is always the thing that keeps me going. During hard times or uncomfortable days in middle school, books were an escape. When I needed to quiet my mind after a stressful day, I picked up a book and devoured it. I remember how my younger self relied on the worlds of fiction to keep the unpleasantness of life at bay. Blasting through a book in a single sitting was exhilarating. My entire body would be vibrating with excitement when I closed the final page. Books were my life.

As an adult, the opportunity to devour a book still makes me jittery. However, I feel like my present self lacks some of my younger self’s dedication. Yes, I’ve hit my Goodreads goals and have lists of books to read. It’s true that I’ve already planned what books to read this year. The problem is, I’ve gone weeks without picking up a book. When I was younger, I read almost every day. Now, I feel lackluster about the entire thing. 

I know that I’m among many people my age who’ve drifted a bit from books. Instead of burying our noses in novels, we’re reading works crafted online. There’s nothing wrong with that! I’ve read some amazing stories on the internet created by very talented writers. Many of these I would never be able to enjoy in a novel form. However, I can feel my internet deep dives shortening my attention span. With this shortened attention span, my brain sometimes struggles with novels. It leads to feelings of burnout for my favorite hobby. 

A week ago, I finished an interesting book that left my brain swimming. It led me on a Goodreads rabbit trail in search of more fascinating books to positively kick off my 2020 reading challenge. A day later I wanted to binge YouTube and forget all about my reading challenge. I set myself up for success, but I still felt early burnout. It’s frustrating to watch myself begin the cycle anew.

I know that tomorrow I might set down my phone and finally get to The ScrewTape Letters. Or, I could continue my procrastination. Either way, it’s okay to feel burned out by something. Even if it’s a dearly loved hobby. Sometimes, we must take a break from things we love to remember why we hold them in our hearts. If you’ve ever felt reader burnout, don’t let it keep you down. A book will come into your life and relight your spark for reading. Until then, be kind to yourself. Don’t forget that you’re not alone in this state. 

What are some ways that you’ve pulled yourself out of a reading burnout? Let me know in the comments below. If you want to recommend a book to help me out of this reading rut, you can fill out the survey here. You can check out my Goodreads for some inspiration here if you’re in the same boat. Who knows, you might some inspiration!

Goodreads: Challenge Accepted

A new year is dawning tomorrow, full of new promises and exciting experiences. Like most people stepping into the new year, I have goals for my 2020 self. One of the goals on my list has to do with one of the most popular reading sites: Goodreads. I’ve done their yearly reading challenge for the past three years. While the first year wasn’t a success, for the past two attempts I’ve been over my book goal. This year I’ve read 35 books and my goal was only 30! 

I want to use this momentum to go into the new year with my 2020 goal. I want to read 40 books by December 31st, 2020. While this is only five more books than what I read this year, it feels like a strangely overwhelming amount of books. It’s odd, because when I was little I could knock out 40 books like it was nothing. Now, with my job and the distracting pull of the internet, it feels almost impossible. However, when I do the math it adds up to about 3 books a month, plus a few extra here-and-there. That, readers, is a great way to make your goals more attainable. Narrowing it down to a month-by-month basis has helped me accomplish my reading goals, so it might help you accomplish yours as well!

Another way I’ve helped set myself up for success is the “want to read” list on Goodreads. When I’ve reread my yearly novels and am out of ideas, I can consult that list and find some great stories to check out. Last year I had it pulled up every time I went into the library for inspiration. I can also keep track of the books coming out this year that I want to read. I would’ve forgotten the release date of Maureen Johnson’s new book if it wasn’t a part of my list! I can also use it to vett what I want to read, so that I don’t waste my time with books that I end up putting down. 

However, I’ve thrown a wrench into this plan that makes it a bit more difficult. I want at least five of the 40 books I’m going to read to be either non-fiction or classic literature. I don’t think that the classic literature challenge will be that difficult, but the non-fiction side of this challenge makes me nervous. Since I could read, I’ve been a fiction-obsessed reader who rarely dips her toe into the non-fiction world. Non-fiction can be fun, but the writing style of most novels in that genre make me want to slam my head on a table. I’m hoping that this challenge will remind me that there is a good side to non-fiction, and maybe even find some books that I want to reread in the future.  


The books are piling up in my mind, and my “want to read” list is rapidly growing. With that in mind, I have a feeling I’ll be sipping champagne and thumbing through a book when the clock strikes twelve. What are your reading goals for 2020? Are there new books you want to read, or old ones you’ve been meaning to read again? Let me know in the comments below! If you have any book recommendations for me to check out in 2020, you can fill out the survey found here. Happy New Year everyone!

A Love Letter to the Kindle

The times of hectic holiday travel and leaving at least one thing at the hotel are among us. With all those stressful but fun scenarios to work through, a book lover is left scrambling to keep up with their books.  Being a book fanatic for as long as I can remember, I have struggled with holding onto all of my books during the holiday season. My mom often found books all over the house, in the car, and of course on the floor of the hotel room seconds before we checked out. Cramming the car with fifteen books was not something my parents wanted to continue in the future. So, when the Kindle hit the market, two were beautifully wrapped under our tree on Christmas morning.

Though it has been out for a while and we’ve seen many different iterations, I’m still amazed by how many books I can cram onto that device. I still love reading physical books as much as the next reader, but my Kindle has been a lifesaver more than once. Firstly, I can fit it in my purse and magically still have room for my plethora of odds-and-ends. Since I don’t have Hermione’s bottomless purse or Mary Poppin’s carpet bag, fitting one hundred and thirty books into my purse would be impossible without it. Sure, I don’t need to read all of them at once but having the option to reread any book I choose whenever I want is awesome! Also, I live in a tiny apartment where bookshelf space is scarce and carefully curated. Buying only physical books would result in my apartment turning into a swimming pool made of novels.

I’ve been very lucky in life and have been able to travel to some amazing places. On those seven-hour drives to the beach or flights abroad, my Kindle has been a wonderful companion. Stuck in the airport after already finishing your book because you read way too fast? Congrats, you’ve got a gazillion other options to choose from! As long as you have access to wifi and an Amazon password, the possibilities are endless. Also, some Kindle books can be cheaper than the books they sell in the airport, so it’s more efficient to hop onto Amazon for a new book and download it onto your device. I remember being stuck on an eight-hour flight with no urge to watch movies and a fully charged Kindle at the ready. I blazed through Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone and hopped over to reread a specific scene from another novel. I tend to get an intense urge to read certain scenes in books after I’ve read them the first few times, so being able to go straight to the chapter without having to thumb through pages is great.

Finally, one of my favorite things about the magical world of Kindle’s and similar devices are samples. Emily, you may be saying, out of all the possibilities you choose samples? Why? Well, think back to a time when you picked up a new book in a store. You read the back, it seemed interesting, but you didn’t have time to peek inside to see if you liked the writing style before you shelled over $25. Then, you get back to the comfort of your coziest chair, crack open the book, and two chapters in you put it down. Two years later, it’s still sitting on your bookshelf, gathering dust and taking up a space that could be filled with one of the new book in a series you’ve been eyeing for weeks. With the sample option on Kindle, you can read the first few chapters before spending money on a book you might not like. I’ve read so many samples that never get to the full book stage on my Kindle because the first few chapters sent boredom alarm bells through my mind. It’s also a great way to keep track of what books you want to buy in the future, be them traditional books or in the Kindle book format.

Do you have a Kindle or Nook? What do you like about using them? Or, if you don’t have one, why? Let me know in the comments below! If you want to recommend some Kindle books that you’ve enjoyed this year, you can submit them here.

5 Relatable GIFs For Readers

In this modern world of Snapchat and Instagram stories, visual forms of communication are more popular than ever. One of the most popular, and greatest in my opinion, are GIFs. They’re relatable, hilarious, and can get your point across without saying a word. The emotions they convey can be perfect for almost any situation. Upset that your team lost again? There’s a GIF for that. Excited because your best friend got a promotion? Cue the happy dance GIFs. When it comes to readers or book addicts, the options are endless. There’s a GIF for everything from discovering your new favorite couple, to finishing a series and not knowing what to do with yourself. Here are five of those GIFs that have readers saying, “can relate”.

  1. Packing your books for a trip.
via GIPHY

When the time comes for a book lover to go on a trip, how can they just bring one book? Blasphemy! We, like Merlin, love bringing options for any mood or situation. Sadly, magical packing skills and bottomless bags aren’t something I’m blessed with.

2. Going to the library or bookstore for new books.


via GIPHY

Most readers can relate to Belle, especially in the above GIF. Going to the library or the bookstore is like stepping into a magical word of opportunity. Plus, the smell of books flooding the shop or library is like heaven to a reader’s nose. If my library had one of those ladders, you can bet that I’d be swinging along just like Belle.

3. Trying to explain why you’re obsessed with books.


via GIPHY

Some readers began their love affair with reading later in life, but some have been inhaling books since they could put letters into words. From that day on, the books you read feel like they become a part of you. It’s lovely, especially if you grew up reading something life-changing like Harry Potter or the Narnia series. The best part of all? You can share these amazing stories with the next generation and see how it shapes their world.

4. When you hear someone bad mouthing your favorite character.


via GIPHY

When a reader loves a story, they usually love it deeply. The same can be said for characters. Be it a rouge, charming villain or a wholesome sidekick, readers are protective of their favorites. Many will fight you if you dismiss or belittle the characters they’ve grown so close too. Opinions of stories are allowed to be varied, but any extreme claim about a character will have angry readers storming the internet castle. I know that I’ve grown close to Kylo-ing out when I heard someone say that Luna Lovegood wasn’t a good character!

5. When someone keeps disturbing you while you’re reading


via GIPHY

There’s nothing worse than being deep into a wonderful story, about to discover a life-altering plot point, when… “Hey!!” Someone disturbs you and pulls you out of the book and back into the dreaded real world. Important memo to non-readers or those who read less frequently than their book-obsessed friends: do NOT disturb someone reading unless it is a life or death situation. Have a funny cat meme you’ve been dying to show them? Wait until they close the book or prepare to face their wrath. I’ve been on the giving and receiving end of this look, and let’s be real, it never ends well.

I hope you enjoyed diving into the book lover’s GIF world! Are there GIFs that you relate to as a reader? Let me know in the comments down below! Also, I have a feature where you can send me book recommendations. You can send me those by filling out the survey here, or comment below this post and I’ll add it to my Goodreads!