10 Harry Potter Quotes That are Super Relatable

Since its publication, Harry Potter has been a touchstone of popular culture. Like many iconic stories, the quotes of Harry Potter are everywhere. From words of encouragement during dark times to sassy one-liners, this series has it all. These quotes are somehow extremely relatable in the real world despite a disappointing lack of magic. Here are five situations where the sentiment of these quotes ring true:

  1. When you decide to question instructions from your boss or teacher.
  1. When you don’t want to do the thing and your friends try to help you get out of it.
  1. Any introvert who just wants to chill out and read their book for the 10th time.
  1. That feeling when you’re so tired that a burn just kind of slips out. Goodbye filter, hello sass master.
  1. When it’s hour six of studying for finals with your friends and you’re beyond done.
  1. When someone’s being super unclear for the 90th time and you’re done.
  1. When someone’s trying to convince you to do something stupid and you can see the “bad idea” sign flashing over their head.
  1. When you’re procrastinating but know your adult responsibilities are lurking.
  1. When you accidentally let a secret slip to a gossipmonger.
  1. When someone’s acting like a jerk and you’re the only one who seems to care.

What is your favorite Harry Potter quote?  Let me know in the comments below! There are so many gems that it was difficult to narrow it down to this list. With a sassy character like Harry as the main character, the relatable quotes are endless. When was the last time you read these books? It might be time to crack open the series again to re-experience these awesome characters. Happy reading!

3 Books to Get You Into the Valentine’s Day Spirit

In a few days, the season of love and chocolate hearts will be upon us. If you’re a single pringle like me, Valentine’s Day is a mixed bag. Sure, it can be a bit of a bummer when you see couples being all lovey-dovey. But, there’s plenty of chocolate and cute gifts that you can get for yourself. Why not embrace the spirit of the day and celebrate self-love? I usually take myself out on a date to the bookstore and drink my favorite wine with takeout. 

I’m also a fan of themes, so every year I read romantic books at the beginning of February. It’s a great way to get yourself into the spirit, and also an excuse to read a sappy rom-com. With countless romantic stories to choose from, you can read any trope of your choosing. I have three go-to stories that I reread when the heart-shaped Reeses appear at Target.

Image via Goodreads

  1. A Little Something Different– Sandy Hall

A Little Something Different is a classic rom-com story with a twist. It tells the story of Gabe and Lea, two students who meet in writing class. Instead of hearing their sides of the tale, the story unfolds through the eyes of others. Everyone from the Starbucks baristas to delivery guy see their romance unfold. Their creative writing teacher ships them. The baristas watch them like they’re a real-life rom-com. The different points of view allow you to see how well these two work together despite their flaws. It’s charming, funny, and a lovely read. If you’re in the mood to relax with a glass of wine this Valentine’s day, this is the book for you.

Image via Goodreads

  1. Pride and Prejudice– Jane Austen

Is it a list of romantic stories without this book? Like many, I’ve read the story of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy a few times. Add the miniseries and 2005 movie to the mix, and you have many ways to enjoy this classic. The mix of dynamic characters and a strong plot make this a must-read. Also, the dynamic between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy is frustrating and exciting. At the beginning of the novel, you are as frustrated with Mr. Darcy as Elizabeth. As the story unfolds, both the reader and Elizabeth learn more about Mr. Darcy’s true character. It’s a great slow-burn romance that allows the characters to grow and learn more about each other. Each time I read it, I roll my eyes at Mr. Collins and shake my head at Elizabeth when she believes Wickham. The romance is still exciting to me, despite my knowledge of the end. If you’re in the mood for a classic enemies-to-lovers story, this novel is the one for you.

Image via Goodreads

  1. Emma– Jane Austen

Another Austen novel? What can I say, the lady is good at her job. This is another classic that tells the story of Emma, the well-off matchmaker. She sees no reason for marriage but enjoys intruding on her friend’s love lives. Meddling has consequences, which Emma must learn from to prevent more disasters. Emma, like Elizabeth, is a well-rounded character who is both frustrating and lovely. She wants what’s best for her friends, but more often than not she has no idea what that is. Her relationship with Mr. Knightley is dynamic and full of respect. When she stumbles, he isn’t afraid to call her out while helping her back up. If you’re a fan of friends to lovers stories with great side characters, this story is for you!


What books do you like to read during this time of year? Let me know in the comments below! If you have any romance novel recommendations, you can send them to me by filling out the survey here. I hope you all have a lovely Valentine’s Day! If you need me I’ll be counting down the hours until all the chocolate goes on sale between books. Happy reading!

A Reader’s Burnout

Reading is always the thing that keeps me going. During hard times or uncomfortable days in middle school, books were an escape. When I needed to quiet my mind after a stressful day, I picked up a book and devoured it. I remember how my younger self relied on the worlds of fiction to keep the unpleasantness of life at bay. Blasting through a book in a single sitting was exhilarating. My entire body would be vibrating with excitement when I closed the final page. Books were my life.

As an adult, the opportunity to devour a book still makes me jittery. However, I feel like my present self lacks some of my younger self’s dedication. Yes, I’ve hit my Goodreads goals and have lists of books to read. It’s true that I’ve already planned what books to read this year. The problem is, I’ve gone weeks without picking up a book. When I was younger, I read almost every day. Now, I feel lackluster about the entire thing. 

I know that I’m among many people my age who’ve drifted a bit from books. Instead of burying our noses in novels, we’re reading works crafted online. There’s nothing wrong with that! I’ve read some amazing stories on the internet created by very talented writers. Many of these I would never be able to enjoy in a novel form. However, I can feel my internet deep dives shortening my attention span. With this shortened attention span, my brain sometimes struggles with novels. It leads to feelings of burnout for my favorite hobby. 

A week ago, I finished an interesting book that left my brain swimming. It led me on a Goodreads rabbit trail in search of more fascinating books to positively kick off my 2020 reading challenge. A day later I wanted to binge YouTube and forget all about my reading challenge. I set myself up for success, but I still felt early burnout. It’s frustrating to watch myself begin the cycle anew.

I know that tomorrow I might set down my phone and finally get to The ScrewTape Letters. Or, I could continue my procrastination. Either way, it’s okay to feel burned out by something. Even if it’s a dearly loved hobby. Sometimes, we must take a break from things we love to remember why we hold them in our hearts. If you’ve ever felt reader burnout, don’t let it keep you down. A book will come into your life and relight your spark for reading. Until then, be kind to yourself. Don’t forget that you’re not alone in this state. 

What are some ways that you’ve pulled yourself out of a reading burnout? Let me know in the comments below. If you want to recommend a book to help me out of this reading rut, you can fill out the survey here. You can check out my Goodreads for some inspiration here if you’re in the same boat. Who knows, you might some inspiration!

Goodreads: Challenge Accepted

A new year is dawning tomorrow, full of new promises and exciting experiences. Like most people stepping into the new year, I have goals for my 2020 self. One of the goals on my list has to do with one of the most popular reading sites: Goodreads. I’ve done their yearly reading challenge for the past three years. While the first year wasn’t a success, for the past two attempts I’ve been over my book goal. This year I’ve read 35 books and my goal was only 30! 

I want to use this momentum to go into the new year with my 2020 goal. I want to read 40 books by December 31st, 2020. While this is only five more books than what I read this year, it feels like a strangely overwhelming amount of books. It’s odd, because when I was little I could knock out 40 books like it was nothing. Now, with my job and the distracting pull of the internet, it feels almost impossible. However, when I do the math it adds up to about 3 books a month, plus a few extra here-and-there. That, readers, is a great way to make your goals more attainable. Narrowing it down to a month-by-month basis has helped me accomplish my reading goals, so it might help you accomplish yours as well!

Another way I’ve helped set myself up for success is the “want to read” list on Goodreads. When I’ve reread my yearly novels and am out of ideas, I can consult that list and find some great stories to check out. Last year I had it pulled up every time I went into the library for inspiration. I can also keep track of the books coming out this year that I want to read. I would’ve forgotten the release date of Maureen Johnson’s new book if it wasn’t a part of my list! I can also use it to vett what I want to read, so that I don’t waste my time with books that I end up putting down. 

However, I’ve thrown a wrench into this plan that makes it a bit more difficult. I want at least five of the 40 books I’m going to read to be either non-fiction or classic literature. I don’t think that the classic literature challenge will be that difficult, but the non-fiction side of this challenge makes me nervous. Since I could read, I’ve been a fiction-obsessed reader who rarely dips her toe into the non-fiction world. Non-fiction can be fun, but the writing style of most novels in that genre make me want to slam my head on a table. I’m hoping that this challenge will remind me that there is a good side to non-fiction, and maybe even find some books that I want to reread in the future.  


The books are piling up in my mind, and my “want to read” list is rapidly growing. With that in mind, I have a feeling I’ll be sipping champagne and thumbing through a book when the clock strikes twelve. What are your reading goals for 2020? Are there new books you want to read, or old ones you’ve been meaning to read again? Let me know in the comments below! If you have any book recommendations for me to check out in 2020, you can fill out the survey found here. Happy New Year everyone!

A Love Letter to the Kindle

The times of hectic holiday travel and leaving at least one thing at the hotel are among us. With all those stressful but fun scenarios to work through, a book lover is left scrambling to keep up with their books.  Being a book fanatic for as long as I can remember, I have struggled with holding onto all of my books during the holiday season. My mom often found books all over the house, in the car, and of course on the floor of the hotel room seconds before we checked out. Cramming the car with fifteen books was not something my parents wanted to continue in the future. So, when the Kindle hit the market, two were beautifully wrapped under our tree on Christmas morning.

Though it has been out for a while and we’ve seen many different iterations, I’m still amazed by how many books I can cram onto that device. I still love reading physical books as much as the next reader, but my Kindle has been a lifesaver more than once. Firstly, I can fit it in my purse and magically still have room for my plethora of odds-and-ends. Since I don’t have Hermione’s bottomless purse or Mary Poppin’s carpet bag, fitting one hundred and thirty books into my purse would be impossible without it. Sure, I don’t need to read all of them at once but having the option to reread any book I choose whenever I want is awesome! Also, I live in a tiny apartment where bookshelf space is scarce and carefully curated. Buying only physical books would result in my apartment turning into a swimming pool made of novels.

I’ve been very lucky in life and have been able to travel to some amazing places. On those seven-hour drives to the beach or flights abroad, my Kindle has been a wonderful companion. Stuck in the airport after already finishing your book because you read way too fast? Congrats, you’ve got a gazillion other options to choose from! As long as you have access to wifi and an Amazon password, the possibilities are endless. Also, some Kindle books can be cheaper than the books they sell in the airport, so it’s more efficient to hop onto Amazon for a new book and download it onto your device. I remember being stuck on an eight-hour flight with no urge to watch movies and a fully charged Kindle at the ready. I blazed through Harry Potter and Sorcerer’s Stone and hopped over to reread a specific scene from another novel. I tend to get an intense urge to read certain scenes in books after I’ve read them the first few times, so being able to go straight to the chapter without having to thumb through pages is great.

Finally, one of my favorite things about the magical world of Kindle’s and similar devices are samples. Emily, you may be saying, out of all the possibilities you choose samples? Why? Well, think back to a time when you picked up a new book in a store. You read the back, it seemed interesting, but you didn’t have time to peek inside to see if you liked the writing style before you shelled over $25. Then, you get back to the comfort of your coziest chair, crack open the book, and two chapters in you put it down. Two years later, it’s still sitting on your bookshelf, gathering dust and taking up a space that could be filled with one of the new book in a series you’ve been eyeing for weeks. With the sample option on Kindle, you can read the first few chapters before spending money on a book you might not like. I’ve read so many samples that never get to the full book stage on my Kindle because the first few chapters sent boredom alarm bells through my mind. It’s also a great way to keep track of what books you want to buy in the future, be them traditional books or in the Kindle book format.

Do you have a Kindle or Nook? What do you like about using them? Or, if you don’t have one, why? Let me know in the comments below! If you want to recommend some Kindle books that you’ve enjoyed this year, you can submit them here.

Four Books to Get You Into the Christmas Spirit

It’s that time of year again! Michael Bublé is crooning Silver Bells in the coffee shop, and Christmas trees are sparkling in households across the world. While some people may bah-humbug at the thought of Christmas and the holiday season, I morph into my final form during this season. Emily the Elf is even more obnoxiously excited and––true to elf form––even more of a cookie fanatic. One of my favorite ways to get into the holiday spirit (other than baking and music of course) is diving into my Christmas book collection. Every reader has a few books that they set aside to read every year with a cup of their favorite festive beverage. Here are four books that I love reading during the Christmas season.

Via Goodreads

1.      The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen 

The Snow Queen is a holiday classic that I’ve loved since I first read it in middle school. This book is also what loosely inspired Frozen! Emphasis on loosely. This story follows a little boy and girl, named Kay and Gerda. When Kay is cursed to only see the bad in the world, he is taken by the Snow Queen to live in her palace of ice. It’s up to Gerda to save her best friend and travel through the realms of the seasons to get to the Snow Queen’s palace. This story is a lovely fairytale that reminds me of the stories I heard as a kid. It can be read at any age and has a fun host of side characters that both help, and hinder, Gerda on her quest.

Via Goodreads

2. Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan

Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares is one of those YA Christmas novels that’s perfect to read while curled up on the couch! The story is a fun combination of crazy adventures, scavenger hunts, as well as a cute romance. It all kicks off when Lily leaves a red notebook in her favorite bookstore with a list of dares. Dash comes across it, and soon they are on a scavenger hunt of festive tasks. Anyone who loves Nick and Nora’s Infinite Playlist will consider this one a holiday staple!

Via Goodreads

3.   Let it Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson, and Lauren Myracle

Let it Snow is a fun group of short stories that take place during a snow storm. The first tale, by Maureen Johnson, follows Jubilee, a high school girl who finds herself on a train to Florida on Christmas Eve after her parents get arrested. Why? Waiting for a new limited edition piece of their Christmas village decor got heated! The train gets stranded in a tiny town, where she meets a new friend, and the other stars of the stories. The second short story, by John Green, follows three friends as they travel through the perilous roads to get to a Waffle House for hash browns, and the stranded cheerleaders on Jubilee’s train. It’s a fun adventure that reminds you of your friends, and makes you crave delicious hash browns. The third story, by Lauren Myracle, wraps up the tales with a story of a barista who is going through a hard time. The lovesick barista is tasked with protecting her bff’s teacup pig, but everything goes awry. The three tales are unique, but all share the same humor and charm that will warm you up on a cold winter day!

Via Goodreads

4. I’m Half-Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley

The fourth and final book on my recommendation list is a bit different. I’m Half-Sick of Shadows is the fourth mystery in the series by Alan Bradley. It follows the eleven-year-old British sleuth and scientist Flavia de Luce as she goes on a quest to trap Father Christmas. Everything’s going to plan, when a film crew arrives at her family’s estate to shoot a movie with a standout star. During a blizzard, the members of Flavia’s town of Bishop’s Lacy gather at the de Luce estate to watch the star perform. It’s all Christmas cheer and excitement, until she’s found murdered! It’s up to Flavia to use her wit and solve another murder, and hopefully catch Father Christmas along the way. Fans of Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie will be charmed by this witty girl. You can read this book mid-series, but if you enjoy it, why not check out the others? Flavia’s charming stories are also wonderful on Audible, where the talented Jayne Entwistle brings her to life.

I hope you enjoy these Christmas-themed books, and that they get you into the holiday spirit! What are some books that you like to read during the holidays? Comments below to let me know! Also, if you have any book recommendations for me, you can send them by filling out the survey found here. Happy Holidays everyone!

5 Relatable GIFs For Readers

In this modern world of Snapchat and Instagram stories, visual forms of communication are more popular than ever. One of the most popular, and greatest in my opinion, are GIFs. They’re relatable, hilarious, and can get your point across without saying a word. The emotions they convey can be perfect for almost any situation. Upset that your team lost again? There’s a GIF for that. Excited because your best friend got a promotion? Cue the happy dance GIFs. When it comes to readers or book addicts, the options are endless. There’s a GIF for everything from discovering your new favorite couple, to finishing a series and not knowing what to do with yourself. Here are five of those GIFs that have readers saying, “can relate”.

  1. Packing your books for a trip.
via GIPHY

When the time comes for a book lover to go on a trip, how can they just bring one book? Blasphemy! We, like Merlin, love bringing options for any mood or situation. Sadly, magical packing skills and bottomless bags aren’t something I’m blessed with.

2. Going to the library or bookstore for new books.


via GIPHY

Most readers can relate to Belle, especially in the above GIF. Going to the library or the bookstore is like stepping into a magical word of opportunity. Plus, the smell of books flooding the shop or library is like heaven to a reader’s nose. If my library had one of those ladders, you can bet that I’d be swinging along just like Belle.

3. Trying to explain why you’re obsessed with books.


via GIPHY

Some readers began their love affair with reading later in life, but some have been inhaling books since they could put letters into words. From that day on, the books you read feel like they become a part of you. It’s lovely, especially if you grew up reading something life-changing like Harry Potter or the Narnia series. The best part of all? You can share these amazing stories with the next generation and see how it shapes their world.

4. When you hear someone bad mouthing your favorite character.


via GIPHY

When a reader loves a story, they usually love it deeply. The same can be said for characters. Be it a rouge, charming villain or a wholesome sidekick, readers are protective of their favorites. Many will fight you if you dismiss or belittle the characters they’ve grown so close too. Opinions of stories are allowed to be varied, but any extreme claim about a character will have angry readers storming the internet castle. I know that I’ve grown close to Kylo-ing out when I heard someone say that Luna Lovegood wasn’t a good character!

5. When someone keeps disturbing you while you’re reading


via GIPHY

There’s nothing worse than being deep into a wonderful story, about to discover a life-altering plot point, when… “Hey!!” Someone disturbs you and pulls you out of the book and back into the dreaded real world. Important memo to non-readers or those who read less frequently than their book-obsessed friends: do NOT disturb someone reading unless it is a life or death situation. Have a funny cat meme you’ve been dying to show them? Wait until they close the book or prepare to face their wrath. I’ve been on the giving and receiving end of this look, and let’s be real, it never ends well.

I hope you enjoyed diving into the book lover’s GIF world! Are there GIFs that you relate to as a reader? Let me know in the comments down below! Also, I have a feature where you can send me book recommendations. You can send me those by filling out the survey here, or comment below this post and I’ll add it to my Goodreads!

A Love Letter to Libraries

If you’ve ever read a book, odds are you’ve stepped foot into a library. The smell of books and shelves full of exciting new worlds are magical. You can get a ton of books with just a swipe of a card and not clutter up your tiny apartment with them — again, magical!

When I was younger, I read like my life depended on it. Saturday afternoon? Sure, my sister and I would play outside, but odds were when it was time for dinner we were reading on our deck. When you have two kids who read books as fast as they eat, you turn to options outside of bookstores. For a few years we went to the tiny library in our small town of Signal Mountain, Tennessee. It was great, but we tore through the children’s section like the Flash. Our mom decided to get us library cards for the Chattanooga Library, a place which still holds magical memories for me to this day.

I remember walking into the library carrying my little pink bag with a dancing teddy bear on it, ready to fill it up with as many books as possible. We could be there for hours, picking out books, reading a few, and even playing games on the early 2000’s computers. It was like a wonderland for baby Emily. Sis and I would sit in a yellow chair among the books and go through our pickings, narrowing down which ones we could take home with us. The library had a rule of 20 books each, which we usually hit every time. The great thing about having a sister who reads as much as you is that we’d leave each time with 40 books to read for a few months. I felt like Matilda every time we walked past the book fountain outside and through the library’s doors. Other than swimming, visiting the library was my favorite thing to do.

Now as a 24-year-old, the library holds many different meanings. It’s still a magical place to get books, but it’s also where I studied for finals and made friends in college. My definition of a library as an adult is not just a place for books; it’s a place where the community comes together and learns. Every time I visit my local library, it feels like a tiny ecosystem. The hardworking staff, the clubs meeting, the students studying for finals. There’s a buzz that’s both calming and electric, motivating me to sit down and read or be productive.

If you haven’t been to your local library in a while, or ever, consider carving out an hour one Saturday afternoon and make the trip. You never know what kind of magic you’ll find in between the shelves. There might be a new world waiting for you to explore, or history waiting to be told. While you’re there, consider talking to a librarian about supporting your local library. At the end of the day, it’s up to us to keep our happy places happy. Anything we can do to help a future generation discover the joys of a land of books is a step in the right direction.