5 More Poems to Get You Into the Halloween Spirit

It’s the spookiest week of the year! In a few short days it will be Halloween, the day I take my final spooky form. It is also sadly the last week of spooky season. In honor of this fun time, I’m back with one last week of spooky content. This week we’re continuing with the wonderful world of poetry. It’s part two! This time we have a mixture of poems outright spooky, and those that capture the eerie vibe of the season. 

  1. “To — — –. Ulalume: A Ballad”- Edgar Allen Poe

It’s no surprise that part two of this list features another Poe poem. He is the king of gothic poetry after all! The tale told in this poem has a melancholy and mysterious vibe that is perfect for spooky season. Poe is great at creating the atmosphere  and setting for this poem. By the time he introduces the characters of this poem, you have a vivid idea of the world around them. He is also great at building suspense. You find yourself wondering what happened that night in October. Then, the poem beautifully brings us with the speaker back into the past when he lost his love. It’s a sad but beautiful poem that is worth checking out. If you want to read this poem,  check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Windigo”- Louise Erdrich 

This poem’s title is named after the supernatural creature from Native-American folklore. The wendigo is a terrifying creature that is created after a human resorts to cannibalism. It wanders with the eternal hunger for human flesh. This poem is from the perspective of this creature. A fascinating way to build suspense and create the eerie tone that makes this poem so great. It’s also a very interesting glimpse into the lore of the Chippewa tribe. Eridich builds a vivid world within this poem. You can hear the woods and touch the objects described in the poem.  If you want a twist on the eerie side of legendary creatures, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Little Orphant Annie”- James Whitcomb Riley

This poem is a mixture of a nursery rhyme and a Brothers Grimm story. In this tale, an orphan named Annie tells stories to scare the kids of the family who employ her. We have another goblin poem, of course. Goblins are perfect supernatural creatures for the spooky season. This poem is a great example of a poem written phonetically. You can almost hear the speaker’s accent as they remember Annie’s tales and personality. I love this one because, as I said earlier, it reminds me of the Brothers Grimm tales that used to spook me as a child. If you want to dramatically read a spooky poem to a younger sibling or child, this is a perfect option. It is the fun side of spooky, and is fun for all ages! As long as there are night lights nearby, of course. If you want to read this tale to your friends, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “The Haunted Wood”- Issac McLellan 

This poem tells the story of a haunted wood, as you could probably guess from the title. It is another poem with a great atmosphere. McLellan even uses language that reminds me of a story that is recited around a campfire on a cool autumn night. He also uses great language to make the world of this poem vivid. This poem gives us a glimpse into the stories of the souls who are buried in the wood. You can hear the echo of these characters as you read on. As a sucker for an atmospheric spooky tale, this is a great poem. If you want to take a trip into the woods, check out the link in the poem’s title. 

  1. “Beyond the Last Lamp”- Thomas Hardy

This list wouldn’t be complete without more ghosts. In this poem, Hardy takes us on a journey down a lane. A lane that brings the speaker to a common sight…or is it? If you could not tell by the rest of this list, I love spooky poems that have a vivid setting that adds to the eerie feeling. A lane itself is not eerie. A lane past the last light during a dark, rainy night adds a new edge to this story. Anyone who has walked in a rainy, dark wood knows how it elevates any normal situation. Add in some specters and you’ve got a poem perfect for the Halloween season. If you want to go down the mysterious lane, check out the link in the poem’s title.

What did you think of these five poems? Are there any spooky poems that you love to read that I didn’t mention? Let me know in the comments below! We are just a few days from the spookiest time of year! I hope you are able to celebrate it safely. I recommend having a movie marathon or a spooky reading session. Let me know in the comments what your plans are for this Halloween. Next week starts NaNoWriMo, also known as National Novel Writing Month. In honor of my third year, I’ll be doing NaNoWriMo themed content for the month of November. Join me next week for the start of my 2020 writing adventure and possibly a snarky writer’s woes. Thanks so much for reading and happy Halloween!

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