5 More Poems to Get You Into the Halloween Spirit

It’s the spookiest week of the year! In a few short days it will be Halloween, the day I take my final spooky form. It is also sadly the last week of spooky season. In honor of this fun time, I’m back with one last week of spooky content. This week we’re continuing with the wonderful world of poetry. It’s part two! This time we have a mixture of poems outright spooky, and those that capture the eerie vibe of the season. 

  1. “To — — –. Ulalume: A Ballad”- Edgar Allen Poe

It’s no surprise that part two of this list features another Poe poem. He is the king of gothic poetry after all! The tale told in this poem has a melancholy and mysterious vibe that is perfect for spooky season. Poe is great at creating the atmosphere  and setting for this poem. By the time he introduces the characters of this poem, you have a vivid idea of the world around them. He is also great at building suspense. You find yourself wondering what happened that night in October. Then, the poem beautifully brings us with the speaker back into the past when he lost his love. It’s a sad but beautiful poem that is worth checking out. If you want to read this poem,  check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Windigo”- Louise Erdrich 

This poem’s title is named after the supernatural creature from Native-American folklore. The wendigo is a terrifying creature that is created after a human resorts to cannibalism. It wanders with the eternal hunger for human flesh. This poem is from the perspective of this creature. A fascinating way to build suspense and create the eerie tone that makes this poem so great. It’s also a very interesting glimpse into the lore of the Chippewa tribe. Eridich builds a vivid world within this poem. You can hear the woods and touch the objects described in the poem.  If you want a twist on the eerie side of legendary creatures, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Little Orphant Annie”- James Whitcomb Riley

This poem is a mixture of a nursery rhyme and a Brothers Grimm story. In this tale, an orphan named Annie tells stories to scare the kids of the family who employ her. We have another goblin poem, of course. Goblins are perfect supernatural creatures for the spooky season. This poem is a great example of a poem written phonetically. You can almost hear the speaker’s accent as they remember Annie’s tales and personality. I love this one because, as I said earlier, it reminds me of the Brothers Grimm tales that used to spook me as a child. If you want to dramatically read a spooky poem to a younger sibling or child, this is a perfect option. It is the fun side of spooky, and is fun for all ages! As long as there are night lights nearby, of course. If you want to read this tale to your friends, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “The Haunted Wood”- Issac McLellan 

This poem tells the story of a haunted wood, as you could probably guess from the title. It is another poem with a great atmosphere. McLellan even uses language that reminds me of a story that is recited around a campfire on a cool autumn night. He also uses great language to make the world of this poem vivid. This poem gives us a glimpse into the stories of the souls who are buried in the wood. You can hear the echo of these characters as you read on. As a sucker for an atmospheric spooky tale, this is a great poem. If you want to take a trip into the woods, check out the link in the poem’s title. 

  1. “Beyond the Last Lamp”- Thomas Hardy

This list wouldn’t be complete without more ghosts. In this poem, Hardy takes us on a journey down a lane. A lane that brings the speaker to a common sight…or is it? If you could not tell by the rest of this list, I love spooky poems that have a vivid setting that adds to the eerie feeling. A lane itself is not eerie. A lane past the last light during a dark, rainy night adds a new edge to this story. Anyone who has walked in a rainy, dark wood knows how it elevates any normal situation. Add in some specters and you’ve got a poem perfect for the Halloween season. If you want to go down the mysterious lane, check out the link in the poem’s title.

What did you think of these five poems? Are there any spooky poems that you love to read that I didn’t mention? Let me know in the comments below! We are just a few days from the spookiest time of year! I hope you are able to celebrate it safely. I recommend having a movie marathon or a spooky reading session. Let me know in the comments what your plans are for this Halloween. Next week starts NaNoWriMo, also known as National Novel Writing Month. In honor of my third year, I’ll be doing NaNoWriMo themed content for the month of November. Join me next week for the start of my 2020 writing adventure and possibly a snarky writer’s woes. Thanks so much for reading and happy Halloween!

5 Poems to Get You Into the Halloween Spirit

It’s spooky season time! If you have read any of my blog posts this month, you’ve probably noticed that I love Halloween. With Halloween, comes a lot of spooky content that is sure to get you into the spirit. Whether you are a movie fan or a book lover, there’s something for you. There’s more than movies and books to get you into the Halloween spirit, though. Throughout history, there’s been enough spooky poems to make even Edgar Allen Poe happy. I’ve found a few that will get you into the spooky spirit!

  1. “The Raven”– Edgar Allen Poe

It wouldn’t be a spooky poetry list without mentioning Mr. Poe at least once. This is one of his most iconic poems. It also includes one of his most iconic lines, where a raven speaks the words “Nevermore”. This is a great poem to check out if you are in a mood for a spooky story. It channels the eerie feeling of a foggy Fall evening. The mood that Poe does so well, and it prevalent in almost all of his poems. If you want to continue down this eerie aesthetic, Poe is the perfect place to start. If you want to read more of this poem, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. Goblin Market”– Christina Rossetti

“Goblin Market” is a different kind of vibe from “The Raven”. This poem reminds me of old fairy tales like those written down by the Brothers Grimm. There’s a mixture of a seemingly light-hearted character and a dark situation. The poem tells the tale of two sisters who come across a goblin market. It is said that those who eat the fruit of the goblins are never the same, and yet one girl is still tempted to visit these mysterious creatures. If you are a fan of that Grimm vibe and goblins, this is a poem for you. It’s spooky factor falls in the risk of this tale instead of straight horror. Still, it’s worth a read during this season. If you want to take a safe trip to the market of goblins, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Song of the Witches” from Macebeth– William Shakespeare

Like Poe, my list wouldn’t be complete without mentioning this poem from the scottish play. This poem is what people imitate when they pretend to be witches. Shakespeare’s influence can be seen through the witch costumes  and bubbling cauldrons we see on Halloween night. His poem also is a bit more light-hearted compared to the others on this list. Maybe not in the context of the play. Outside of the murder plot, this poem is a fun thing to recite when you’re passing candy to children. Bonus points if you are dressed as a witch. Even if we can’t trick-or-treat this year, you can still enjoy the fun side of Halloween with this poem. If you want to read the full version of this spell, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Mary’s Ghost: A Pathetic Ballad”– Thomas Hood

Now we take a sharp left from more light-hearted to super dark. If you aren’t a fan of bones or graves, turn back now. This poem was written by Thomas Hood in the 1820s. During this time, there was a surge of medical students robbing graves to study anatomy. There were even a few students who decided to make their own corpses. In this tale, Mary is the poor victim of one of these grave robbings. This poem goes a bit into what they have done with poor Mary’s bones through the eyes of her ghost. Her ghost appears to a young William, who has to wake up to all this terrible news. Not a fun way to wake up, I’m sure. This poem has a good mixture of dark Regency era history and a bit of spooky vibes. If you want to take a trip into the darker side of history, check out the link in the poem’s title.

  1. “Ghost House”– Robert Frost.

Last but not least, this wonderful poem by Robert Frost. We’ve talked about witches and skeletons, now it’s time to hit on another common symbol of the spooky season; the haunted house. This poem does an awesome job of painting a picture of this decrepit house. It feels like you are walking through an old house full of dust and creaky floorboards. What remains is something that feels eerie in the dark, even if it was once a lovely house. This poem is told from the point of view of a mysterious presence, who may not be alone. It’s an interesting spin on spooky old houses and the ghosts that live within them. If you want to visit this eerie house, check out the link in the poem’s title.

Have you read any of these poems? Is there a poem you love to read during the Halloween season? Let me know in the comments below! I’m sure many of you will be thinking “what about this poem” or “how could she forget this amazing work?” Well friends, I might have a solution for you. This is only part one of my poetry list. It was so hard to narrow it down to five, that it ended up being ten wonderful poems that I had to split up into two parts. In two weeks we’ll be taking another trip to spooky poetry land, so get ready! Any spooky poetry recommendations are still encouraged, of course. Thanks so much for stopping by my blog, and happy reading!

3 Online Content Creators Who Inspire Me

Being a writer in the modern age is exciting. Every day you find new content that serves as inspiration for your own work. From adaptations to new stories, countless online writers create innovative content for the world of the internet. They shine across social media platforms and YouTube. Many of these writers form their own groups and companies to create awesome projects. Three of these groups inspire me to create content of my own.

Via Shipwrecked Comedy

  1. Shipwrecked Comedy

Shipwrecked Comedy is a group of creators who joined forces to create historical content with a comedic flair. The members of Shipwrecked are Sinéad Persaud, Sean Persaud, Mary Kate Wiles, and Sara Grace Hart. Together they’ve created iconic content that inspires me as a writer.

My favorite Shipwrecked project, Edgar Allen Poe’s Murder Mystery Party, was released back in 2016. It follows the adventures of Poe and some historically famous authors as they get swept into a whodunnit mystery. The characters are vibrant, full of personality and wit. The dialogue is top notch, with quips that showcase Shipwrecked’s knowledge of the writers. It’s a must-see for anyone who wants to build strong characters, and a good murder-mystery. 

Throughout all of their content there is a strong sense of storytelling. The costumes are always wonderful, the actors are amazing, and the writing delivers. You can tell that they meticulously plan each plot point to make sure that the story flows. I took some serious notes on plot structure during my second watch of The Case of the Gilded Lily. If you’re interested in checking out their awesome content, you can visit their YouTube channel here

Via Pinterest

  1. Pemberley Digital

Pemberly Digital is a web company that creates modern adaptations of literary classics. They have an amazing talent for weaving social media and vlogs together to tell your favorite stories. 

Their first work, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, is one of my favorite Pride and Prejudice  adaptations. It illustrates how to make these characters vibrant in the modern era. Their use of social media allowed them to let the audience see a side of the story unfolding behind the scenes of the vlogs. They get to play with writing styles for each character’s posts in an exciting way. It’s a great way to learn about writing in different povs. Also, it’s a great insight into writing for different mediums. 

They’ve done four other adaptations since The Lizzie Bennet Diaries. All of these adaptations inspire me to think outside of the box when writing. It’s a reminder that writing has evolved with the modern era. Their content shows how you can use that to your advantage. To check out their amazing adaptations, you can visit their YouTube channel.

Via Reddit

  1. Crash Course

Crash Course is an educational series produced by the digital content companies Complexly and Thought Café. They specialize in creating content for students of all ages. To date, they’ve created over fifteen series about everything from World History to Engineering. There are many different hosts for their content, including Vlogbrothers and authors Hank and John Green.

I was first introduced to Crash Course in my I.B. Biology class. I can still remember the first words Hank Green ever said to me via Crash Course Biology: “Sex, and not dying.” That is definitely a way to get a tired highschooler’s attention! The writing on these episodes are a great illustration of how to write educational content. With the writing style and dynamic hosts, they are able to deliver facts in a fun way. It’s also easy to binge and retain the information. It’s written perfectly for students studying for their finals!

This series is a great study for anyone looking to write educational content in a dynamic way. It’s also a great reminder that writing nonfiction can still be creative and interesting. The research is good, and most importantly, the dialogue is written in a conversational tone. This tone combined with the interesting visuals makes it easy to pay attention and absorb the content. If you want to learn more about their content or some facts about the Mongols, you can visit their YouTube channel.

Sometimes, writing seems like an impossible task. When I feel the imposter syndrome begin to hold me back, I look to others for inspiration. These three groups are just a few of the amazing content creators who inspire me. Who are some online content creators that inspire you to keep writing? Let me know if the comments below!